Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Contains threads on equipment developed by the UK defence and aerospace industry, but not in service with the British Armed Forces.
SW1
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by SW1 »

new guy wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 11:55
SW1 wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 09:10
mrclark303 wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 08:45
SW1 wrote: 09 Aug 2023, 20:44
mrclark303 wrote: 09 Aug 2023, 20:20
SW1 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 22:29
mrclark303 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 22:04
SW1 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 18:09 So if high end military supply companies need to stand and fall on their own products then i assume they can sell those products to whom ever wants them no government interference so they can get a return on their investment in making those products?

It isn’t a black or white argument. Our problem often is we jump around too much from one fad to the next rather getting big into the industrialisation of products we do make and rolling them out across the board. We don’t continue to invest in and iterate in build designs.
Well, it's a tail wagging the dog issue again, there's a good reason the UK spends upwards of 50 billion a year on its small armed forces, but still struggles to field new equipment.

Just look at our absolutely creaking Amoured ability, with obsolete Warriors and ageing Chally 2 at its heart and Bulldogs that are as old as some of the soldiers grandparents!

We invest billions to buy tiny numbers of high end bespoke equipment and as a result our armed forces suffer and the money is syphoned away by defence contractors.

A long winded way of saying that our armed forces is now so small, the requirements so very limited, you have to think long and hard about developing or buying off the shelf.

The Australians have a similar problem, small armed forces, but Christ, they are well equipped for bear!

Super Hornet, Growler and F35A, makes the RAF look decidedly under equipped!

And we spend 'way' more.

Yep I know ITAR, but it doesn't seem to worry the Australians.....
Wasn’t industry that selected and developed boxer in 2003 then walked away for 20 years before deciding to order it. It wasn’t industry that decided not to spend a penny on challenger for 20 years and it wasn’t industry that decided it wanted to refurbish 20 year old warriors rather than building new hulls before walking away and it wasn’t industry that selected Ajax and then decided to redesigned it.

Cant blame uk industry for the rank incompetence that is e7 procurement can you

Do they? How many multiple and sustained air operations are australia running at present? The equipment the RAF is using is excellent.

You continue to pursue a it’s all uk industry’s fault narrative which is bollox quite frankly. The reason nothing changes is senior figures in defence in and out of uniform need a hard look in the mirror and admit they’re rank amateurs when it comes to managing procurement programs and industrial engagement and stop blaming everyone else.
Come along now SW1, are you seriously trying to say the RAF has a better fast jet line up than Australia at the moment?

Really, I don't know what your choice of tipple is, but I would suggest you lay off it a bit.

Just point me in the direction of the RAF's dedicated
fast jet jamming platform that's the equivalent of the Growler, let's start there shall we....

I've looked but can't see it, perhaps it's a super stealth classified platform??

The Australians have an absolutely first class line up from top to bottom. (even better once they have got rid of their tardy European Helicopters) C17, C130J, Airbus MRTT's, F35A and two flavours of Super Hornets....

If you think the RAF's fleet is better than that, then I would love to know what your definition of 'better' is.....

You hear no complaints from the RAAF that's for sure...

The Thypoon isn't even getting an ESA radar until 2030, then only 40 of them, it's bloody pathetic quite frankly....
The RAF has excellent aircraft top to bottom.

So to my original statement how many sustained air operations are the Australian airforce running at present and on how many continents are they doing them on?
The relevance of current operations to force line up and bang for your buck is what exactly SW1?

Your refusal to acknowledge the painfully bleeding obvious, that Australia has a much more capable and rounded fixed wing capability is extremely telling, a gritted teeth agreement perhaps....

Now, want to compare how much this capability has cost the Australians compared to the UK?

I wouldn't if I were you, it shows you just how we spend £50 billion and get fu*k all for our money....

But no, let's stick to a no ITAR position, because that's clearly 'far' more important than actually giving the RAF the tools for the job....

The tail still wags the dog .
The royal airforce has a highly capable fastjet fleet able to conduct air superiority, long range strike and close air support.

Typhoon is a highly capable aircraft as is f35b. Your either ignorance or bias is quite telling. The RAAF has around 80 fastjets the RAF currently around 160.

The RAF is currently conducting several sustained combat air operations at significant distance from the U.K. which at the end of the day is what you acquire and train a force structure to do, it is how you measure bangs for buck or whatever other analogy you care to use. The RAAF is currently doing none.

The RAF is able to design and integrate what it wants from it own defensive and offensive capabilities from its own threat library and industry on its main fastjet aircraft the Australians cannot. The U.K. has sovereignty of capability in this regard the Australians do not.

Go to Luton or the air warfare centre or warton or Edinburgh and show me the equivalent in Australia.
Australia fast jet fleet ( Existing+ on order) :
12 Growlers, 24 super hornets, 72 lightning II. total: 108.
no sounds as of yet for any more orders.

UK fast jet fleet ( Existing+ on order):
47 lightning, ~107 or so typhoons, total, ~155.
Sounds of a second lightning batch
I was comparing current inventory as that seemed less dependent on orders.

We could look at current force elements at readiness but that would be much harder to get open source data on.

Not all of Australias lightning’s are currently delivered. And when they are rumours f18 numbers will reduce.

There is currently more than 107 typhoons and if your counting orders there is supposedly an additional 24 f35 ordered.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Timmymagic »

SW1 wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 12:39
I was comparing current inventory as that seemed less dependent on orders.

We could look at current force elements at readiness but that would be much harder to get open source data on.

Not all of Australias lightning’s are currently delivered. And when they are rumours f18 numbers will reduce.

There is currently more than 107 typhoons and if your counting orders there is supposedly an additional 24 f35 ordered.
The additional orders for F-35 after the initial '48' should be 26 more....there is a rumour that a replacement for the lost F-35 will also be procured...personally I expect that one of the 26 will be designated as the replacement.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

SW1 wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 09:10
mrclark303 wrote: 10 Aug 2023, 08:45
SW1 wrote: 09 Aug 2023, 20:44
mrclark303 wrote: 09 Aug 2023, 20:20
SW1 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 22:29
mrclark303 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 22:04
SW1 wrote: 08 Aug 2023, 18:09 So if high end military supply companies need to stand and fall on their own products then i assume they can sell those products to whom ever wants them no government interference so they can get a return on their investment in making those products?

It isn’t a black or white argument. Our problem often is we jump around too much from one fad to the next rather getting big into the industrialisation of products we do make and rolling them out across the board. We don’t continue to invest in and iterate in build designs.
Well, it's a tail wagging the dog issue again, there's a good reason the UK spends upwards of 50 billion a year on its small armed forces, but still struggles to field new equipment.

Just look at our absolutely creaking Amoured ability, with obsolete Warriors and ageing Chally 2 at its heart and Bulldogs that are as old as some of the soldiers grandparents!

We invest billions to buy tiny numbers of high end bespoke equipment and as a result our armed forces suffer and the money is syphoned away by defence contractors.

A long winded way of saying that our armed forces is now so small, the requirements so very limited, you have to think long and hard about developing or buying off the shelf.

The Australians have a similar problem, small armed forces, but Christ, they are well equipped for bear!

Super Hornet, Growler and F35A, makes the RAF look decidedly under equipped!

And we spend 'way' more.

Yep I know ITAR, but it doesn't seem to worry the Australians.....
Wasn’t industry that selected and developed boxer in 2003 then walked away for 20 years before deciding to order it. It wasn’t industry that decided not to spend a penny on challenger for 20 years and it wasn’t industry that decided it wanted to refurbish 20 year old warriors rather than building new hulls before walking away and it wasn’t industry that selected Ajax and then decided to redesigned it.

Cant blame uk industry for the rank incompetence that is e7 procurement can you

Do they? How many multiple and sustained air operations are australia running at present? The equipment the RAF is using is excellent.

You continue to pursue a it’s all uk industry’s fault narrative which is bollox quite frankly. The reason nothing changes is senior figures in defence in and out of uniform need a hard look in the mirror and admit they’re rank amateurs when it comes to managing procurement programs and industrial engagement and stop blaming everyone else.
Come along now SW1, are you seriously trying to say the RAF has a better fast jet line up than Australia at the moment?

Really, I don't know what your choice of tipple is, but I would suggest you lay off it a bit.

Just point me in the direction of the RAF's dedicated
fast jet jamming platform that's the equivalent of the Growler, let's start there shall we....

I've looked but can't see it, perhaps it's a super stealth classified platform??

The Australians have an absolutely first class line up from top to bottom. (even better once they have got rid of their tardy European Helicopters) C17, C130J, Airbus MRTT's, F35A and two flavours of Super Hornets....

If you think the RAF's fleet is better than that, then I would love to know what your definition of 'better' is.....

You hear no complaints from the RAAF that's for sure...

The Thypoon isn't even getting an ESA radar until 2030, then only 40 of them, it's bloody pathetic quite frankly....
The RAF has excellent aircraft top to bottom.

So to my original statement how many sustained air operations are the Australian airforce running at present and on how many continents are they doing them on?
The relevance of current operations to force line up and bang for your buck is what exactly SW1?

Your refusal to acknowledge the painfully bleeding obvious, that Australia has a much more capable and rounded fixed wing capability is extremely telling, a gritted teeth agreement perhaps....

Now, want to compare how much this capability has cost the Australians compared to the UK?

I wouldn't if I were you, it shows you just how we spend £50 billion and get fu*k all for our money....

But no, let's stick to a no ITAR position, because that's clearly 'far' more important than actually giving the RAF the tools for the job....

The tail still wags the dog .
The royal airforce has a highly capable fastjet fleet able to conduct air superiority, long range strike and close air support.

Typhoon is a highly capable aircraft as is f35b. Your either ignorance or bias is quite telling. The RAAF has around 80 fastjets the RAF currently around 160.

The RAF is currently conducting several sustained combat air operations at significant distance from the U.K. which at the end of the day is what you acquire and train a force structure to do, it is how you measure bangs for buck or whatever other analogy you care to use. The RAAF is currently doing none.

The RAF is able to design and integrate what it wants from it own defensive and offensive capabilities from its own threat library and industry on its main fastjet aircraft the Australians cannot. The U.K. has sovereignty of capability in this regard the Australians do not.

Go to Luton or the air warfare centre or warton or Edinburgh and show me the equivalent in Australia.
Right, let's start with the corrections, you do realise that the number of airframes available and operational isn't the same as the numbers in service?

Of course you do, be prepared for a nasty shock, the RAF's operationally active Thypoon fleet is about 60, with slight variations up or down. The deployable F35B fleet currently stands at 12, at a push....

Also factor in the fleets within fleets situation with Thypoon. An increasing issue in itself.

So that's about 80, with in use reserves. Of that, the bulk is required for UK air defence, based on the QRA Squadrons having to have two machines available 24/7.

The deployable element is about 24 machines, 12 on an enduring operation ( at a push).

So your 160 is rather an 'embellishment' shall we say!

I'm assuming rose tinted glasses and choosing to ignore the fact the RAF has been stripped to the absolute bone, that's the simple unpalatable fact of the matter.

Do I consider that the Australians could deploy more mass on an operation, yes, simply because they have fewer air defence requirements on average.

As a force mix, they can deploy a more effective force than the RAF, they have a very capable mix of fully multi role assets, including their own cutting edge suppression of air defence assets, all extremely well supported, armed and able to fully intergrate with Uncle Sam.

I appreciate you flying the flag SW1,I really do, but let's take a reality check shall we.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Little J »

mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 14:51 Right, let's start with the corrections, you do realise that the number of airframes available and operational isn't the same as the numbers in service?
Not sure what point you're trying to make here, because that can be said about every Air Force in the world, including the RAAF. Not even 'Murica!!!! has all its aircraft available all the time.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Meriv9 »

Are we really really taking Australian procurement like an example?

Are you sure?

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

Meriv9 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 18:12 Are we really really taking Australian procurement like an example?

Are you sure?
Looks pretty sweet to me Meriv, you won't see any RAAF pilots complaining!

The only bad buys are are the piss poor European Helicopters they are divesting themselves of...

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

Little J wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 16:55
mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 14:51 Right, let's start with the corrections, you do realise that the number of airframes available and operational isn't the same as the numbers in service?
Not sure what point you're trying to make here, because that can be said about every Air Force in the world, including the RAAF. Not even 'Murica!!!! has all its aircraft available all the time.
Not my point being made Little J, SW1 made reference to a 160 strong force, just pointing out the wafer thin light blue line is 'way' thinner than that ......

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Meriv9 »

mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 19:40
Meriv9 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 18:12 Are we really really taking Australian procurement like an example?

Are you sure?
Looks pretty sweet to me Meriv, you won't see any RAAF pilots complaining!

The only bad buys are are the piss poor European Helicopters they are divesting themselves of...
And Spanish LHD ships with Engine problems
And Destroyers built locally with blocks not simetric not precision built (Hobarts)
Diminishing the T26 from 9 to what'ever they are going to order
The Sea1000 has been a joke.
Their programs are decade in delay completely missing the window of opportunity of China
Image

Plus like Canadian procurement it isnt what you bought is what you bought at what price and which economy.

If UK economy would have growth at the same steady pace of Australia for the last 30 years do you believe the Uk armed forces would be better or worse than the AU ones? I really really doubt that Australians procurement outperforms yours regardless of Ajax and other failed programs.

Just in case everything is a IMHO, and again in IMHO reading here how AU is better than you guys,once taken all the context in consideration, sounds like the French forum when they say that the Indians would be good partners for the FCAS :crazy:

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by SW1 »

mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 19:43
Little J wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 16:55
mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 14:51 Right, let's start with the corrections, you do realise that the number of airframes available and operational isn't the same as the numbers in service?
Not sure what point you're trying to make here, because that can be said about every Air Force in the world, including the RAAF. Not even 'Murica!!!! has all its aircraft available all the time.
Not my point being made Little J, SW1 made reference to a 160 strong force, just pointing out the wafer thin light blue line is 'way' thinner than that ......
Between typhoon and f35 the raf has around 160 fastjets. That’s just a fact like it is raaf having around 80. Neither has that many in the fwd fleet or available to deploy as I mentioned but I’ll guarantee you the raf has more available for operations than the raaf.

As my original point the raf is deployed on multiple multinational operations, the raaf currently is not. The maximum contribution of Australian fastjets to coalition operations in the past 25 years is 14 in iraq in 2003. The raf had more than that deployed on operations this past 18 months.

You point that the raaf is somehow more capable somehow able to bring more to coalition operations simply because it bought American equipment is nonsense.
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

Meriv9 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 20:04
mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 19:40
Meriv9 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 18:12 Are we really really taking Australian procurement like an example?

Are you sure?
Looks pretty sweet to me Meriv, you won't see any RAAF pilots complaining!

The only bad buys are are the piss poor European Helicopters they are divesting themselves of...
And Spanish LHD ships with Engine problems
And Destroyers built locally with blocks not simetric not precision built (Hobarts)
Diminishing the T26 from 9 to what'ever they are going to order
The Sea1000 has been a joke.
Their programs are decade in delay completely missing the window of opportunity of China
Image

Plus like Canadian procurement it isnt what you bought is what you bought at what price and which economy.

If UK economy would have growth at the same steady pace of Australia for the last 30 years do you believe the Uk armed forces would be better or worse than the AU ones? I really really doubt that Australians procurement outperforms yours regardless of Ajax and other failed programs.

Just in case everything is a IMHO, and again in IMHO reading here how AU is better than you guys,once taken all the context in consideration, sounds like the French forum when they say that the Indians would be good partners for the FCAS :crazy:
Sorry Meriv, I m not really following you, mearly staying that Australia has a better military aircraft line up than we have.

The tragedy is that the Thypoon programme has been running for 40 years this year ( the inception of European Combat Aircraft programme), it's been in service for 20 years and still the development programme crawls on at a snails pace, still no ESA radar fielded, it's pathetic really.

Super Hornet is a very comparable aircraft and Australia bought a fully developed and weapon integrated machine capable of the full spectrum of operations right now, not years from now!

They face a threat from China, they need capable assets now, not tomorrow.

Thypoon is an incredibly capable aircraft, built by the wrong countries, Germany has slowed and put so many roadblocks in the way, they have cost us all valuable foreign sales.

As it stands today, the follow up order with Saudi Arabia for a further 48 aircraft, badly needed by both our economies, has been scuppered by Germany.

I have high hopes for Tempest, with Britain, Japan, Italy and Saudi Arabia, there's no roadblocks or slow downs, providing we don't make it unaffordable, it's got huge potential for foreign sales too.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

SW1 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 20:07
mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 19:43
Little J wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 16:55
mrclark303 wrote: 11 Aug 2023, 14:51 Right, let's start with the corrections, you do realise that the number of airframes available and operational isn't the same as the numbers in service?
Not sure what point you're trying to make here, because that can be said about every Air Force in the world, including the RAAF. Not even 'Murica!!!! has all its aircraft available all the time.
Not my point being made Little J, SW1 made reference to a 160 strong force, just pointing out the wafer thin light blue line is 'way' thinner than that ......
Between typhoon and f35 the raf has around 160 fastjets. That’s just a fact like it is raaf having around 80. Neither has that many in the fwd fleet or available to deploy as I mentioned but I’ll guarantee you the raf has more available for operations than the raaf.

As my original point the raf is deployed on multiple multinational operations, the raaf currently is not. The maximum contribution of Australian fastjets to coalition operations in the past 25 years is 14 in iraq in 2003. The raf had more than that deployed on operations this past 18 months.

You point that the raaf is somehow more capable somehow able to bring more to coalition operations simply because it bought American equipment is nonsense.
I'm going to start thinking you are a politician SW1, you dance around the facts like an expert!

Let's pull up one of your arguments, you are talking about Gulf War 2, the RAF is litteraly a shadow of its 2003 self today, with the mass stripped away.

20 years later it has a grand total of 6 operational squadrons.

Currently 5 Typhoon and one F35....

The vital Jaguar and Harrier fleets gone without replacement and the Tornado force simply withdrawn, again without replacement as the RAF struggled to balance it's budget.

All the while spending £50 billion on defence ( as a whole) with procurement well in the red....

Bottom line, a relitivly healthy budget and sod all to show for it, you seriously don't see a problem there??

Forgot industry and just think purely about operational capacity for a minute.

I would personally much rather (as it bloody should be) the RAF operated a fully developed Typhoon force of 12 Tranche 3+ squadrons, all ESAR equipped, with conformal fuel tanks and a wide variety of weaponry.

It should be, we've bloody paid for that, but look what we've got for our money, a tiny Typhoon force that's all different specs and still years away from fielding an ESAR, even then only 40 aircraft!!!!!

I'll say it again, absolutely piss poor....

It's enough to make you cry, the Thypoon is such a potentially fantastically capable aircraft, yet I sadly doubt it will ever reach its full potential, born from the wrong parents....

These are the sad facts. Ask the RAF if today they would rather be operating 8 Squadrons of fully matured multirole Super Hornets and Growlers and their huge array of weaponry, or it's current (fleets within fleets) of Thypoons, I will guarantee the answer they would give.

With its NATO responsibilities and increased UK Air defence commitments, the RAF could deploy 12 Typhoon and 12 F35B on an enduring Gulf War type operation, the Australians could deploy more and a more capable and well rounded force at that. You do not like that unpalatable fact SW1( I certainly don't) but that's we're we are after a terrible mix of successive defence cuts and 'appalling' European programme management...

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by new guy »

But Australia doesn't have 8 super hornet squadrons. They have 2.
Australia has never deployed 24 jets in such a way as you suggest
and yes, the RAF is a failure.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by SW1 »

So this is your logic the uk could conduct national air defence tasking, contribute to nato air tasking AND contribute 24 fastjets to a gulf style operation but the Australians are better because they could contribute more to a gulf style operation despite having never deployed more than 14 fastjets in the last 25 years to any conflict.

The raf and fleet air arm have 7 operational typhoon sqns, 1 f35 Sqn with the 2nd f35 Sqn in the process of standing up along with several reaper and protector sqns. Manpower not equipment numbers remains a challenge.

The last line sums you up america brilliant, europe uk bad. That’s about as far as your thought process goes and concludes my discussion on this topic.
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

new guy wrote: 12 Aug 2023, 11:05 But Australia doesn't have 8 super hornet squadrons. They have 2.
Australia has never deployed 24 jets in such a way as you suggest
and yes, the RAF is a failure.
I didn't say they had, it's a hypothetical RAF force structure....

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

SW1 wrote: 12 Aug 2023, 11:16 So this is your logic the uk could conduct national air defence tasking, contribute to nato air tasking AND contribute 24 fastjets to a gulf style operation but the Australians are better because they could contribute more to a gulf style operation despite having never deployed more than 14 fastjets in the last 25 years to any conflict.

The raf and fleet air arm have 7 operational typhoon sqns, 1 f35 Sqn with the 2nd f35 Sqn in the process of standing up along with several reaper and protector sqns. Manpower not equipment numbers remains a challenge.

The last line sums you up america brilliant, europe uk bad. That’s about as far as your thought process goes and concludes my discussion on this topic.
Another politicians reply SW1, nowhere am I saying America brilliant....

You're on the ropes with no counter argument, you are obviously fine with the RAF's current piss poor line up.

You have no comment (or apparent issue with) to make on the glaring issues with Thypoon, it's tiny numbers and fleets within fleets, or still many years from ESR deployment....

Your Trump style ' false news' ' false news' message dosen't make the situation better you know....

This sir concludes my discussion on the matter.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Jensy »

Reads almost like an advertorial from Leonardo, so take it with a heavy dose of salt:

https://www.flightglobal.com/helicopter ... mpaign=RSS

However hopefully some of this proposals come to pass:
a three-unit order last year from an undisclosed North African customer has enabled reactivation of the Yeovil, UK final assembly line.

And Adam Clarke, managing director Leonardo Helicopters UK, says additional “opportunities are in negotiation”.

If these are successfully concluded, the volumes under discussion would lead to a “double-digit backlog” for the Wildcat, said Clarke, speaking at an event in Yeovil on 22 August.

Clive Higgins, chief executive of Leonardo UK, adds: “We are having active conversations with a number of potential users. Over the next six to 12 months we’d like to start seeing some of that coming through.”

Leonardo’s optimistic forecast for the AW159 – albeit a recurring but unrealised theme throughout the programme’s history – also extends to Yeovil’s other current product, the AW101.

“Both product lines are in really good health,” says Clarke, who forecasts a “very busy outlook”.

He sees up to five “really strong opportunities” for the AW101 in different configurations.

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by mrclark303 »

Jensy wrote: 23 Aug 2023, 15:06 Reads almost like an advertorial from Leonardo, so take it with a heavy dose of salt:

https://www.flightglobal.com/helicopter ... mpaign=RSS

However hopefully some of this proposals come to pass:
a three-unit order last year from an undisclosed North African customer has enabled reactivation of the Yeovil, UK final assembly line.

And Adam Clarke, managing director Leonardo Helicopters UK, says additional “opportunities are in negotiation”.

If these are successfully concluded, the volumes under discussion would lead to a “double-digit backlog” for the Wildcat, said Clarke, speaking at an event in Yeovil on 22 August.

Clive Higgins, chief executive of Leonardo UK, adds: “We are having active conversations with a number of potential users. Over the next six to 12 months we’d like to start seeing some of that coming through.”

Leonardo’s optimistic forecast for the AW159 – albeit a recurring but unrealised theme throughout the programme’s history – also extends to Yeovil’s other current product, the AW101.

“Both product lines are in really good health,” says Clarke, who forecasts a “very busy outlook”.

He sees up to five “really strong opportunities” for the AW101 in different configurations.
“Both product lines are in really good health,” says Clarke, who forecasts a “very busy outlook”.

I would hate to see what bad health looks like then....

The 101 has been steady, certainly not a runaway success, the Wildcat is unlikely to ever even reach three figures....

Did Adam Clarke sell houses or used cars before by any chance, talk about salesman's blurb😂😂
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

Post by Jensy »

mrclark303 wrote: 23 Aug 2023, 16:45 “Both product lines are in really good health,” says Clarke, who forecasts a “very busy outlook”.

I would hate to see what bad health looks like then....

The 101 has been steady, certainly not a runaway success, the Wildcat is unlikely to ever even reach three figures....

Did Adam Clarke sell houses or used cars before by any chance, talk about salesman's blurb😂😂
I'd bet a fiver he's behind this too:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-66588021

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mrclark303

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mrclark303
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

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Jensy wrote: 24 Aug 2023, 20:35
mrclark303 wrote: 23 Aug 2023, 16:45 “Both product lines are in really good health,” says Clarke, who forecasts a “very busy outlook”.

I would hate to see what bad health looks like then....

The 101 has been steady, certainly not a runaway success, the Wildcat is unlikely to ever even reach three figures....

Did Adam Clarke sell houses or used cars before by any chance, talk about salesman's blurb😂😂
I'd bet a fiver he's behind this too:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-66588021

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Always the same, put signage out to a cheap contractor and they make mistakes, it should read 'home of Italian Helicopters' 😂😂
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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

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:D Thunderbird 2 :D :thumbup:

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Re: Leonardo (Agusta-Westland)

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Article Text

Leonardo and the UK Ministry of Defence (MOD) are pleased to unveil a mature concept of the technology demonstrator, known as project “Proteus” by the British Armed Forces, at DSEI London 2023 .

As part of phase 3a of the RWUAS CCD Phase 3 TDP, awarded in July 2022 by the UK MOD Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) Future Capability Group (FCG), a design which highlights conceptual maturity for uncrewed VTOL and modularity has been finalised.

Leonardo and UK MOD are adopting a fully integrated team approach, adopting agile principles to drive an outcome-based project.
The technology demonstrator’s mission systems and mission modules will ensure rapid role changes for frontline commands, including naval and land forces, with mission flexibility during embarked operations. In close partnership with DE&S, Leonardo continues to investigate the potential systems which will contribute to the technology demonstrator’s final architecture that will form part of the UK MOD Rotary Wing Strategy, as contracted on the four-year programme. Leonardo is adopting new technologies including the development of a full digital twin and additive manufacturing techniques to consolidate trade-offs between capability, performance, cost, sustainability, and serviceability.

James Gavin, head of the Future Capability Group at Defence Equipment and Support, said: “Key to this project’s success is the close collaboration between the Royal Navy, DE&S’s Future Capability Group and Leonardo’s Team. Our Strategy at DE&S is clear that agility, innovation and team work with industry are essential drivers to ensure our Armed Forces have the operational edge – elements which Proteus embodies.”

Adam Clarke, Managing Director of Leonardo Helicopters UK, commented: “As the onshore design authority, Leonardo is exploring the art of the possible at a capability level, which will also invoke an extensive adoption of autonomy and automation into our future technologies. The RWUAS TDP is unique because it is much more than the technology – it’s about the teamwork and integration that is taking place between us and the UK MOD in enabling a dynamic, transparent, and flexible approach, which will ensure long-term uncrewed capability benefits that will de-risk the path to fully autonomous flight.”

The design selected is optimum for maritime operations. The single-engine RWUAS air vehicle, in the 2-3t class, will be capable of being adapted to deliver a wide range of roles including maritime surveillance, maritime organic air missions, and logistics supply.

The Proteus TDP will inform the Royal Navy’s Future Maritime Aviation Force (FMAF) vision for Anti-Submarine Warfare and AEW support. The technology demonstrator is anticipated to fly by the middle of this decade.

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