English Electric Lightning (1959-1988) (RAF)

Contains threads on Royal Air Force equipment of the past, present and future.
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ArmChairCivvy
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Re: English Electric Lightning (1959-1988) (RAF)

Post by ArmChairCivvy »

Ever heard how the Swedes took ONE of the Lightning engines, lightened up their Draken (as an experimental a/c) and went thru Mach 2 with it... tempted to say 'with ease' but the report does not say that
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Lord Jim
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Re: English Electric Lightning (1959-1988) (RAF)

Post by Lord Jim »

I thought the Draken used a 200 series Avon as standard, with a bit of Swedish ingenuity added. Both are incredible aircraft to see in action, the Lightning's vertical QRA scramble at dusk was a sight to behold.

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ArmChairCivvy
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Re: English Electric Lightning (1959-1988) (RAF)

Post by ArmChairCivvy »

Lord Jim wrote: 23 May 2022, 22:32 I thought the Draken used a 200 series Avon as standard, with a bit of Swedish ingenuity added. Both are incredible aircraft to see in action, the Lightning's vertical QRA scramble at dusk was a sight to behold.
airvectors.net fills in the story:
" SAAB had been hoping to obtain an uprated engine for the J 35B, designated the RM6C, which was a copy of the substantially uprated Rolls-Royce Avon 300 "big bore" engine, fitted with the Swedish EBK 66 afterburner. The RM6C could provide 56.4 kN (5,750 kgp / 12,700 lbf) dry thrust, and 76.8 kN (7,830 kgp / 17,260 lbf) afterburning thrust.

When the RM6C finally became available, it resulted in a new Draken variant, the "J 35D (David)", which was the first Mach 2 Draken. The only really noticeable external change from the J 35B was that the engine inlets were modified, being extended forward under the canopy. The new engine was unsurprisingly thirstier than the old, and so the David featured increased fuel capacity. The J 35D also replaced the centerline pylon with twin side-by-side fuselage pylons, both of which were "wet"; the wing pylons were also wet, meaning the David could carry four external tanks instead of one. "

which means that the Swedes could have counter-struck Moskvu
... of which the Sviet spies were certainly aware of.

Now, who on here knows that the Swedes only cancelled their independent A-bomb project in the '60s?
- and what came in , to replace that deterrent... the press will tell you in a year, or two
Ever-lasting truths: Multi-year budgets/ planning by necessity have to address the painful questions; more often than not the Either-Or prevails over Both-And.
If everyone is thinking the same, then someone is not thinking (attributed to Patton)

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ArmChairCivvy
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Re: English Electric Lightning (1959-1988) (RAF)

Post by ArmChairCivvy »

Lord Jim wrote: 23 May 2022, 22:32 I thought the Draken used a 200 series Avon as standard, with a bit of Swedish ingenuity added. Both are incredible aircraft to see in action, the Lightning's vertical QRA scramble at dusk was a sight to behold.
airvectors.net fills in the story:
" SAAB had been hoping to obtain an uprated engine for the J 35B, designated the RM6C, which was a copy of the substantially uprated Rolls-Royce Avon 300 "big bore" engine, fitted with the Swedish EBK 66 afterburner. The RM6C could provide 56.4 kN (5,750 kgp / 12,700 lbf) dry thrust, and 76.8 kN (7,830 kgp / 17,260 lbf) afterburning thrust.

When the RM6C finally became available, it resulted in a new Draken variant, the "J 35D (David)", which was the first Mach 2 Draken. The only really noticeable external change from the J 35B was that the engine inlets were modified, being extended forward under the canopy. The new engine was unsurprisingly thirstier than the old, and so the David featured increased fuel capacity. The J 35D also replaced the centerline pylon with twin side-by-side fuselage pylons, both of which were "wet"; the wing pylons were also wet, meaning the David could carry four external tanks instead of one. "

which means that the Swedes could have counter-struck Moskvu
... of which the Sviet spies were certainly aware of.

Now, who on here knows that the Swedes only cancelled their independent A-bomb project in the '60s?
- and what came in , to replace that deterrent... the press will tell you in a year, or :lol: two
Ever-lasting truths: Multi-year budgets/ planning by necessity have to address the painful questions; more often than not the Either-Or prevails over Both-And.
If everyone is thinking the same, then someone is not thinking (attributed to Patton)

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