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AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

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SKB
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AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby SKB » 03 May 2015, 12:52

Image

The AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat (previously called the Future Lynx and Lynx Wildcat) is an improved version of the Westland Super Lynx military helicopter designed to serve in the battlefield utility, search and rescue and anti-surface warfare roles. In British service, common variants are being operated by both the Royal Navy and British Army to replace their old Lynx rotorcraft. The AW159 has also been offered to several export customers, including the Republic of Korea Navy which placed an order for 8 in 2013. Lynx/Super Lynx thread: viewtopic.php?f=45&t=188

The AW159 Wildcat is the successor to, and a further development of, the Westland Lynx. While the AW159 shares broad similarities in appearance to the Lynx, it has significant design differences and is heavily modernised and adapted to gain new attributes and functionality. The AW159 comprises 95% new components; the remaining 5%, consisting of such items as the fuel system and main rotor gearbox, are interchangeable with the Lynx AH7 and HMA8 variants. The AW159 is the first helicopter by AgustaWestland to be designed inside an entirely digital environment. Among other changes, certain external elements of the Wildcat, such as the tail rotor, have been redesigned for greater durability and stealth qualities.

Both Army and Navy variants are based on a common airframe, which is suitable for marine use and equipped with a wheeled undercarriage. The AW159 is powered by two 1,362 hp (1,016 kW) LHTEC CTS800 turboshaft engines, and has a new composite tailboom, tailplane, tail rotor, nose structure and avionics suite. The naval version is also equipped with a SELEX Galileo Seaspray 7000E active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and L-3 Wescam MX-15Di electro-optical/infrared nose turret. In June 2014, the Royal Navy awarded Thales Group a £48 million contract to deliver the Lightweight Multirole Missile (Martlet) for the Wildcat under the Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapons Light (FASGW (L)) program for targets such as small boats and fast attack craft. A Wildcat can carry four launchers each with five Martlets. In March 2014 a contract was awarded to MBDA for the Sea Venom (FASGW Heavy) missile for use against vessels and land targets, replacing the Sea Skua. Both missiles are being integrated by AgustaWestland in a single £90m programme by 2018, with IOC for both planned by October 2020.

The AW159 is reported to have significant ISTAR capabilities and improved situational awareness through the onboard integrated digital open systems architecture; it has been equipped with the Bowman communications system, allowing for data such as targeting and voice communications to be securely and seamlessly transmitted to friendly forces. Some AW159 models have been fitted with various General Dynamics-built mission systems, these include secured data recorders and tactical processing systems which integrate sensor data and application information for displaying within the cockpit as well as for retention within encrypted data storage. Other mission systems used on the Wildcat have been produced by BAE Systems

The UK has ordered 34 Wildcats for the British Army and 28 for the Royal Navy. The Royal Navy commissioned a Wildcat Fielding Squadron, known as 700W Naval Air Squadron (700W NAS) in 2009. The Army Air Corps also formed the Wildcat Fielding Team. Both units are located at RNAS Yeovilton. In February 2012, a prototype Wildcat (airframe ZZ402) conducted 20 days of trials aboard HMS Iron Duke off the coasts of England and Scotland. The trials were designed to test the helicopter in challenging weather conditions, test its onboard systems and define the Wildcat's ship-helicopter operating limits for when the type enters service in 2015. During the trials, a total of 390 deck landings were completed including 148 night landings, 76 of which being conducted by pilots using night vision goggles.

The first production naval Wildcat was received in May 2013 by 700W NAS; at this point further trials of the type were still being conducted, which included deck landings aboard RFA Mounts Bay. In July 2012, the Wildcat conducted its first public display at the Farnborough Airshow. At the event, Defence Secretary Philip Hammond stated that the "Wildcat represents a considerable advance over the current Lynx helicopters, bringing greatly improved performance and capability."

On 29 August 2014, the Wildcat AH1 formally entered operational service with the Army Air Corps. On 23 March 2015, the Royal Navy's first Wildcat HMA2 began its initial operational deployment at sea onboard the Type 23 frigate, HMS Lancaster.

AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat

Crew: 2 pilots
Capacity: 7 passengers, including door gunner
Length: 15.24 m (50 ft 0 in)
Height: 3.73 m (12 ft 3 in)
Max takeoff weight: 6,000 kg (13,228 lb)
Powerplant: 2 × LHTEC CTS800-4N turboshaft, 1,015 kW (1,361 hp) each
Main rotor diameter: 12.8 m (42 ft 0 in)
Main rotor area: 128.7 m2 (1,385 sq ft)
Maximum speed: 291 km/h (181 mph; 157 kn)
Range: 777 km (483 mi; 420 nmi)
Ferry range: 963 km (598 mi; 520 nmi)
Endurance: 2 hr 42 min (4 hr 30 min with auxiliary fuel tanks)
Armament:
Forward firing CRV7 rockets and machine guns,
Pintle mounted machine gun, e.g. FN MAG (Army) or Browning M2 (Navy).
Air-to-Surface Missile systems:
up to 4x Thales Martlet (Lightweight Multirole Missile), formerly Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon (Light).
up to 4x MBDA Sea Venom, formerly Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon (Heavy). Physically similar replacement for the Sea Skua, a combined design with France's Anti-Navire Léger to disable or destroy vessels up to 1000 tonnes.
Sting Ray torpedo and depth charges


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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby SKB » 03 May 2015, 13:38




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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby GibMariner » 27 May 2015, 15:54

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-la ... dcat-ocean

The Royal Navy’s commando carrier HMS Ocean operated the Navy’s latest attack helicopter, the Wildcat, for the first time


Not exactly "latest news" as this happened during Joint Warrior, still nice to see

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby SKB » 27 May 2015, 16:00

Some of the Type 23's have the new Wildcat operating from them too. Such as HMS Lancaster.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 28 May 2015, 12:01

i sort of struggle with Naval wildcat, I think the merlin is the more flexible helicopter in terms of capability, lift etc the only thing it lacks is Air to surface which would appear to be the niche role for the wildcat as in terms of lift capability is limited and ability to work independently chasing submarines is also limited. If merlin was fitted with LMM and sea venom would there be any need for Wildcat naval ?

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby RichardIC » 28 May 2015, 12:31

Merlin, as good as it is (and I believe it's very good) takes up a lot of room, is expensive to operate, and you can only operate one on any current or predicted escort - two could be carried on T26 if the mission bay is utilised but I expect that it wouldn't be practical to operate both simultaneously.

T45 have operated with two Lynx HMA8 and could with Wildcat. T26 also expected to be able to operate with two.

That adds a lot of options.

And unfortunately there's absolutely no indication Merlin will ever have any anti-surface capability beyond carrying a hoofing great gun.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 28 May 2015, 21:14

yes merlin won't get Air to surface capability because it then removes the need for wildcat

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby sea_eagle » 10 Jun 2015, 22:56

From SKB
The UK has ordered 34 Wildcats for the British Army and 28 for the Royal Navy.

This was subsequently changed to 30 for the British Army and 4 diverted to Special Forces + an additional 4 ordered for Special Forces.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby Gabriele » 10 Jun 2015, 23:51

sea_eagle wrote:From SKB
The UK has ordered 34 Wildcats for the British Army and 28 for the Royal Navy.

This was subsequently changed to 30 for the British Army and 4 diverted to Special Forces + an additional 4 ordered for Special Forces.


And then apparently reverted to 34 and 28. The announced Light Assault Helicopter variant was announced, then fell away into silence and i don't think it is in the plan as of now.
Probably the Lynx 9A will keep the job at least out to 2018, and then... who knows.
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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 20 Jun 2015, 20:40

AW149 or 189 would be a better choice than wild cat

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby raven111 » 20 Jun 2015, 22:24

marktigger wrote:AW149 or 189 would be a better choice than wild cat


Why's that?

Also keep in mind that the AW189 is just an AW149 with all the military kit stripped out for civvie sales.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 21 Jun 2015, 01:15



the Army need a helicopter than can lift light gun

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby raven111 » 21 Jun 2015, 09:27

marktigger wrote:the Army need a helicopter than can lift light gun


You mean like the Puma can?

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 21 Jun 2015, 09:34

something that belongs to the army that can lift up to those sorts of weights. And has lift capability greater than the wildcat offers. Wildcat as a laison/observation maybe armed escort type helicopter but as an Ah9/212 replacement something is needed a little more capable but sub puma

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby arfah » 21 Jun 2015, 09:38

.....................
-<>-<>-<>-

Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 21 Jun 2015, 09:54

I know Puma isn't an army asset it and chinook should be and should always have been.

But the Lynx Ah9 was designed as a light utility lift platform to lift small detachments around the battlespace, The 212 was used in belize and currently in Brunei to fulfill this intermediate lift role for training.

It is a useful capability. the aim should be to improve and enhance the lift capability available not the usual preserving empires and maintaining the status quo which has dogged UK support helicopter since the 1960's.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby ArmChairCivvy » 21 Jun 2015, 10:25

Hence
"The AAC seems purely Battlefield Recon and Anti Armour."
it is one of the three fighting arms (of the army) and everything else is support.

Now, about medium helos> On the fantasy fleets thread when discussing what number would reflect the current uncommitted/ committed a/c budget, I made the point that for rotary, the reserved budget becomes uncommitted fairly soon in its totality. Whether it all goes to AH, or will a UH type emerge, will soon be known.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 22 Jun 2015, 06:44

Lynx AH9 is a utility model that will retire next year with the loss of 9 Regt.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby Tiny Toy » 22 Jun 2015, 08:57

marktigger wrote:I know Puma isn't an army asset it and chinook should be and should always have been.

That would be duplication of resources, which is wasteful and expensive. We need to get out of the mentality of exclusive ownership of capabilities, it's increasingly out of kilter with the most efficient and effective solutions. If the services can't bring themselves to share capabilities then maybe we need to look at integrating the services.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby ArmChairCivvy » 22 Jun 2015, 09:11

marktigger wrote:Lynx AH9 is a utility model that will retire next year with the loss of 9 Regt.


Convoy duty, fast roping small teams, recce/liaison... not really what elsewhere counts as utility (UH)?

Is it true, btw, that their engines are needed and therefore the whole (fairly recently upgraded) fleet will be dumped?
- or is it simply the Wildcat numbers being deemed sufficient?

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 22 Jun 2015, 22:10

Tiny Toy wrote:
marktigger wrote:I know Puma isn't an army asset it and chinook should be and should always have been.

That would be duplication of resources, which is wasteful and expensive. We need to get out of the mentality of exclusive ownership of capabilities, it's increasingly out of kilter with the most efficient and effective solutions. If the services can't bring themselves to share capabilities then maybe we need to look at integrating the services.


No they should have been AAC assets not RAF.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 22 Jun 2015, 22:14

ArmChairCivvy wrote:
marktigger wrote:Lynx AH9 is a utility model that will retire next year with the loss of 9 Regt.


Convoy duty, fast roping small teams, recce/liaison... not really what elsewhere counts as utility (UH)?

Is it true, btw, that their engines are needed and therefore the whole (fairly recently upgraded) fleet will be dumped?
- or is it simply the Wildcat numbers being deemed sufficient?


when the AH9 was brought in in the days of proper warfighting they were to move teams like FOO's FAC's Milan and Javelin(SAM) as well as small patrols and specialists.
Given that squadrons and regiments will disappear I would conclude there is insuficient airframes.

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby The Armchair Soldier » 29 Jun 2015, 10:43

A nice display here by two RN Wildcats:



I had no idea helicopters could fly backwards (as seen at 1:27)

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby marktigger » 29 Jun 2015, 16:05

lynx could roll

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Re: AW159 Wildcat Helicopter (RN & AAC)

Postby Tiny Toy » 01 Jul 2015, 10:45

The Armchair Soldier wrote:I had no idea helicopters could fly backwards (as seen at 1:27)

Oh yes. And sideways.


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