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Boeing Chinook (RAF)

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Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby SKB » 03 May 2015, 20:57

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The Boeing Chinook is a tandem rotor helicopter operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF). A series of variants based on the United States Army's Boeing CH-47 Chinook, the RAF Chinook fleet is the largest outside the United States. RAF Chinooks have seen extensive service including fighting in the Falklands War, peace-keeping commitments in the Balkans, and action in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

The Chinook HC2 aircraft, normally based at RAF Odiham, provides heavy-lift support and transport across all branches of the British armed forces, and is supported by the smaller, medium-lift helicopters such as the AgustaWestland Merlin HC3 and the Westland Puma HC1, based at RAF Benson and RAF Aldergrove.

RAF Chinooks have been widely deployed in support of British military engagements, serving their first wartime role in Operation Corporate, the Falklands War, in 1982. Chinooks were used in Operation Granby in the 1991 Gulf War, attached to large peace-keeping commitments in the Balkans, the continued British presence in Afghanistan, and in Operation Telic in the 2003 Iraq War. They provide routine supply and support missions to the British military, notably in Operation Banner in Northern Ireland. The helicopter has also been of use in military humanitarian missions and the extraction of civilians from warzones, such as the evacuation of Sierra Leone in 2000, and the evacuation from Lebanon in 2006.

One Chinook in particular, known by its original squadron code Bravo November, has come to widespread public recognition due to its remarkable service record. It has seen action in every major operation involving the RAF in the helicopter's 25-year service life, including the Falkland Islands, Lebanon, Germany, Northern Ireland, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

Crew: 3–4 (pilot, copilot, one or two air loadmasters depending on aircraft role)
Capacity: 55 soldiers and equipment
Length: 30.1 m (98 ft 9 in)
Rotor diameter: 18.3 m (60 ft 0 in)
Height: 5.7 m (18 ft 8 in)
Empty weight: 10,185 kg (22,450 lb)
Loaded weight: 12,100 kg (26,680 lb)
Max. takeoff weight: 22,680 kg (50,000 lb)
Powerplant: 2 × Honeywell T55-GA-712 turboshaft, 2,800 kW (3,750 hp) each
Maximum speed: 295 km/h (183 mph)
Service ceiling: 5,600 m (18,500 ft)
Rate of climb: 10.1 m/s (1,980 ft/min)
Armanent: 2× M134 Miniguns and 1× M60 machine gun


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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 03 May 2015, 21:08

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Why this forum is pish!

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby SKB » 03 May 2015, 21:12

arfah wrote:If we're to have a Wokka thread than this lady needs a mention.
http://www.raf.mod.uk/news/royalairforc ... vember.cfm


Ah yes, I mentioned 'Bravo November' in the thread introduction ^ and also below :)

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 14 May 2015, 17:43

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Why this forum is pish!

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Re: Chinook Helicopter (RAF)

Postby The Armchair Soldier » 15 May 2015, 13:37


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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 18 May 2015, 18:50

............
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Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby SKB » 27 May 2015, 19:29

'Bravo November' ZA718
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Introduction
Bravo November is the original identification code painted on a British Royal Air Force Boeing Chinook HC4 military serial number ZA718. It was one of the original 30 aircraft ordered by the RAF in 1978 and has been in service ever since. It has been upgraded several times in its history, now being designated as an HC4 airframe. It has seen action in every major operation involving the RAF in the helicopter's 30-year service life. Since 1982 it has served in the Falkland Islands, Lebanon, Germany, Northern Ireland, Kurdistan, Iraq and Afghanistan. The aircraft has seen four of its pilots awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for actions whilst in command of Bravo November.

It first came to the attention of the general public for its survival of the Falklands Campaign. In April 1982 Bravo November was loaded, along with three other Chinooks, aboard the container ship MV Atlantic Conveyor bound for the Falkland Islands on Operation Corporate. Atlantic Conveyor was hit by an Exocet missile destroying the vessel along with its cargo. Bravo November was on an airborne task at the time and managed to land on HMS Hermes, gaining the nickname "The Survivor". It was the only serviceable heavy lift helicopter available to British forces involved in the hostilities. The first of its four Distinguished Flying Crosses came for actions in the Falklands. Ever since, the name Bravo November became associated with this aircraft that has become "most famous" in the popular imagination. The aircraft is the subject of an exhibit at the RAF Museum.

Construction and callsign
Thirty Chinooks were ordered by the British Government in 1978 at a price of US$200 million. These helicopters were to become British variants of the United States Army's Boeing CH-47 Chinook. ZA718 was one of the final HC1s the RAF received in February 1982. The US army introduced an upgraded Chinook, the CH-47D in the 1980s with improvements including upgraded engines, composite rotor blades, a redesigned cockpit to reduce pilot workload, redundant and improved electrical systems, an advanced flight control system (FCS) and improved avionics. The RAF designation for this new standard of aircraft was the Chinook HC2 with ZA718 becoming the first RAF airframe to be converted in 1993–94. Bravo November has been refitted and upgraded numerous times during its service in the British Armed Forces. There are few parts of the original aircraft that survive today though the "main fuselage, the manufacturer's data plate in the cockpit and the RAF’s serial number ZA718 clearly emblazoned on the rear of the aircraft remain ever present."

The aircraft has had a number of callsigns and designations throughout its career. It had the Boeing construction number of B-849 with the RAF airframe number of ZA718 which is still visible at the rear of the aircraft. The squadron code number of the aircraft has varied with the squadron in which it serves. The most famous code was Bravo November (BN) which it had during the Falklands War and has been associated with it ever since.

Career
Bravo November has had a distinguished career within the Royal Air Force serving in every conflict of the last 30 years and has seen four of its pilots awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for actions whilst at the controls of the aircraft.

Falklands War
In April 1982 Bravo November was loaded, along with three other Chinooks, aboard the container ship MV Atlantic Conveyor bound for the Falkland Islands. The Chinooks along with other helicopters and all the second-line repair and maintenance support equipment and stores, were sent to the Falkland Islands to spearhead the British landings there. Whilst en route to the Falklands the Chinooks were having their rotor blades refitted by the small party of 6 technicians of 18 Sqn RAF on board, the 1st time such a feat had been attempted. By 25 May 1982 only two of the Chinooks had undergone this refitting. When the Atlantic Conveyor was attacked and sunk on 25 May 1982 by an Argentine Navy Dassault Super Étendard that had fired an Exocet sea-skimming missile one of these Chinooks, Bravo November, was airborne on a task at the time, picking up freight from HMS Glasgow. It thus avoided the ship's destruction and later landed on the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes, gaining the nickname "The Survivor". Owing to the rapid spread of fire and smoke aboard the Atlantic Conveyor after the Exocet strike, it was not possible to fly any of the helicopters that remained on the ship's deck.

The strike on the Atlantic Conveyor had now rendered British forces with only one serviceable heavy lift helicopter, and there were no spares, service manuals, lubricants or tools for it. Even so it was able to carry some 1,500 troops, 95 casualties, 650 POWs and 550 tons of cargo. The first Distinguished Flying Cross was awarded for actions in the Falklands War. ZA718 was on a night mission when pilot Squadron Leader Dick Langworthy and his co-pilot Flight Lieutenant Andy Lawless, descended after losing visibility in a thick snow shower, hitting the sea at around 100 knots (175 km/h) due to a faulty altimeter. The impact threw up spray that flooded the engine intakes but Langworthy and his co-pilot managed to get the helicopter back in the air. The fuselage was damaged, an antenna had been lost and the co-pilot's door had been removed. While the co-pilot door was missing, the crew of Bravo November were unable to navigate or communicate with other forces. Bravo November returned to San Carlos for damage inspection. The impact had caused "little more than dents to the fuselage and damage to the radio systems." Sqn Ldr Langworthy was awarded a DFC for his bravery at the controls of ZA718 during the campaign.

Iraq War
Twenty years after the Falklands conflict Bravo November saw service in Iraq, being the first British helicopter to land Royal Marines ashore. After departing from HMS Ark Royal, Bravo November landed the first Royal Marines on to the Al-Faw peninsula to seize oil-pumping facilities before Iraqi troops could destroy them. The second DFC for actions at the controls of Bravo November was awarded to Squadron Leader Steve Carr for his role in an operation in Iraq. Bravo November was tasked with delivering the Marines to the landing sites marked by US special forces before returning for more troops, guns and freight. The aircraft was being flown at an altitude of less than 100 ft with restricted visibility due to dust clouds thrown up by American armoured forces.

Afghanistan conflict
In June 2006, whilst serving in the Afghanistan conflict, Flight Lieutenant Craig Wilson, Captain of ZA718/BN from 1310 Flt in Helmand Province, received the third Distinguished Flying Cross for 'exceptional courage and outstanding airmanship' while operating in Helmand Province. During the night of 11 June 2006, Flt Lt Craig Wilson was tasked with picking up a casualty. The mission was successful despite the difficult and dangerous conditions that led Wilson to fly the aircraft at the low altitude of 150 ft. A few hours after this incident, the helicopter was called out again on operations, with Wilson landing the helicopter despite being low on fuel. After being on duty for over 22 hours, Wilson volunteered to take reinforcements to the front line, returning with two wounded soldiers. For his actions over the 24‑hour period Flt Lt Wilson was awarded the DFC.

In 2010, Bravo November was involved in another incident while on service in Afghanistan when pilot Flight Lieutenant Ian Fortune was hit by a ricochet from a bullet fired by Taliban fighters during an extraction of injured soldiers. Flt Lt Fortune landed the helicopter in a "hot zone" that was under heavy Taliban fire. After landing the aircraft was hit numerous times. One round ricocheted and hit Fortune's helmet at the attaching point for the Night Vision Goggles (NVG's) and smashed the visor. He stayed in control of the aircraft and continued to rescue his wounded colleagues and land his damaged helicopter. For his actions he was awarded the fourth Distinguished Flying Cross in the history of the aircraft.

Legacy
At the RAF Museum in London there is a forward fuselage of a former United States Army Chinook painted to represent "Bravo November - the RAF's Most Famous Chinook". The exhibit was opened by retired Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns on the 25th anniversary of the Falklands war. He said that "Bravo November is a hugely significant aeroplane to the RAF... The RAF almost never singles out individual aircraft for tribute. But Bravo November is exceptional."

The museum's fine art collection also houses a painting by Joe Naujokas, depicting two of the DFCs completed by 'Bravo November'. The painting was presented to the Royal Air Force Museum by Sir Michael Jenkins, president of Boeing UK, on 9 December 2004.

Chinook ZA718 "Bravo November" continues to serve on active duty.

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Re: Chinook Helicopter (RAF)

Postby marktigger » 27 May 2015, 19:42

the book scram has some interesting things to say about BN

Pity we didn't replace the Belvedere with them in the 60's early 70's but better late than never

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby SKB » 27 May 2015, 19:48

BN surely deserves an honoury medal of some sort. If it were human, surely a VC? Not saying 'give BN a VC', but something of high merit.

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Re: Chinook Helicopter (RAF)

Postby marktigger » 27 May 2015, 20:49

allegedly the documentation for BN is marked "Airframe for preservation"

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 27 May 2015, 23:22

............
-<>-<>-<>-

Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Chinook Helicopter (RAF)

Postby marktigger » 28 May 2015, 11:18

TBH how much of the current BN is the original is open to speculation a mate who worked on Julius program said basically the identification plate . However I personally would have liked to have seen her retired before she went through Julius and preserved. and an additional CH47F bought. My big fear is some Herbert will bend her before she can be preserved! and If she is to be preserved I hope its inside at Hendon or Duxford!

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby SKB » 02 Jun 2015, 22:41

A new multi-million pound training facility for the RAF’s Chinook helicopter pilots and crew is to be developed at RAF Odiham, Hampshire.
http://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/new ... AF_Odiham/

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 05 Jun 2015, 06:58

............
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Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Chinook Helicopter (RAF)

Postby Geoff_B » 08 Jun 2015, 06:50

marktigger wrote:the book scram has some interesting things to say about BN

Pity we didn't replace the Belvedere with them in the 60's early 70's but better late than never


We did (well almost) in 1967 we ordered 15 CH-47B to replace the Belvedere for the RAF East of Suez, XV841-XV855, but the order was cancelled 9 months later as a Defence saving.

We also attempted to select and order a new Medium Lift Helicopter MLH in 1970-71 and had tested both the Chinook and Sea Stallion at Boscombe before deffering the decision back to the 80s due to budget constraints, although we eventually went ahead in the late 70s.

We were actually considering the Chinook in the ASW role in the early 60s in contention with the Sea King, the studies for the Escort Cruiser to go with the CVA-01 mention being sized for eiither aircraft as they hadn't selected which and of course they have rather different footprints.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby marktigger » 08 Jun 2015, 14:03

if Borneo had continued it would have made a huge difference

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby sea_eagle » 10 Jun 2015, 20:55

Slighty old news, 2 x Chinook are being deployed to the Falklands.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-3008933/Falklands-force-attack-fear-boost.html

Details on the new Honeywell T55-L-714A gas turbines being fitted to the whole Chinook fleet as part of Project Julius £408mn upgrade. 20% increase in hp, 7% lower fuel consumption, Time Between Overhaul increased from 2,400 hours to 3,000 hours.
http://www51.honeywell.com/aero/common/documents/myaerospacecatalog-documents/Helicopters-documents/T55-L-714A__CH47_Engine_.pdf

Additional £150million to further upgrade the Chinook fleet with a Digital Automatic Flight Control System replacing the analogue system.
http://aviationweek.com/military-government/uk-contracts-boeing-chinook-digital-flight-control-upgrade

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby sea_eagle » 30 Jun 2015, 20:59

I was wondering how the Chinook fleet would be standardised with the 46 upgraded with Thales kit but the 14 new HC6 are fitted with Boeing kit.
Found this great article here:
http://www.aeroresource.co.uk/articles/2015/uk-mod-helicopter-upgrades/

So they will be the same but slightly different!

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby ArmChairCivvy » 30 Jun 2015, 23:12

Even the early Brit Chinooks were like no other
... radar warning kits taken off the Avro Vulcans being decommissioned

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby The Armchair Soldier » 23 Oct 2015, 16:33

Image

Image

Image
The first Chinook helicopters and around 150 personnel moved to Royal Air Force Benson on Wednesday as the Chinook Operational Conversion Flight joined their Puma colleagues.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 24 Oct 2015, 11:58

............
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Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 08 Dec 2015, 14:38

............
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Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby WhitestElephant » 08 Dec 2015, 15:04

arfah wrote:14th and final HC.6 delivered bringing the total fleet strength to 60.

The R.A.F. is the 2nd largest operator after the U.S.Army.

http://www.janes.com/article/56501/uk-r ... helicopter


Technically, yes this is true. The RAF as an operator, behind the US Army as an operator.

Though Japan operates a total of ~80 Chinook, but split between the Ground and Air defence forces.
Though we are not now that strength which in old days moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are. - Lord Tennyson (Ulysses)

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby arfah » 08 Dec 2015, 15:10

............
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Why this forum is pish!

1: Ineffective moderators
2: Too many fantasists ruining dedicated equipment threads with notions of what gun/mortar/artillery/missiles the equipment should have because it makes their panties moist.

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Re: Boeing Chinook (RAF)

Postby ArmChairCivvy » 08 Dec 2015, 15:43

sea_eagle wrote:Details on the new Honeywell T55-L-714A gas turbines being fitted to the whole Chinook fleet as part of Project Julius £408mn upgrade. 20% increase in hp, 7% lower fuel consumption, Time Between Overhaul increased from 2,400 hours to 3,000 hours.


Have lost sight of the Nxt-Gen Chinook, which was meant to have 50% more power...surely that upgrade won't be doable to the current generation airframes. And interesting to see if the Germans still want a heavy-lift helo force, when the time is up on their current Super Stallions
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... 2_(HMM-772)_receive_fuel_from_a_KC-130_Hercules.jpg


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