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Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN) [News Only]

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Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN) [News Only]

Postby SKB » 02 May 2015, 16:04

Edit by The Armchair Soldier:

Please Read Before Posting:
To prevent important news items from being bogged down by general discussion, we have decided to split this topic. This topic will now be used for news only. You are encouraged to post news in this thread - as well as discuss it - but please do not allow your discussions to meander onto other topics and keep speculation to a minimum.

For general discussion, please use the newly-created Current & Future Escorts - General Discussion topic. Within that topic, you may discuss the Type 23 more broadly, as well as the current and future escort fleet in general.

Please Private Message an administrator if you need further clarification on these changes.

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Original post by SKB:

Image
^ HMS Sutherland (F81)

Introduction
The Type 23 frigate or Duke class is a class of 16 frigates built for the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. The ships are named after British Dukes, thus leading to the class being commonly known as the Duke class. The first Type 23, HMS Norfolk, was commissioned in 1990, and the sixteenth, HMS St Albans was commissioned in June 2002. They form the core of the Royal Navy's destroyer and frigate fleet and serve alongside the Type 45 destroyers.

Originally designed for anti-submarine warfare in the North Atlantic, the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates have proven their versatility in war fighting, peace-keeping and maritime security operations around the globe. Thirteen Type 23 frigates remain in service with the Royal Navy, with three vessels having been sold to Chile and handed over to the Chilean Navy.

The Royal Navy’s current Type 23 frigates will be replaced by the Global Combat Ship starting from 2021. As of 2012 it is planned that HMS Argyll will be the first Type 23 to retire from the Royal Navy in 2023 while HMS St Albans will be the last, in 2036.


Development
When first conceived in the late 1970s, the Type 23 was intended to be a light anti-submarine frigate to counter Soviet nuclear submarines operating in the North Atlantic. The Type 23 would be replacing the Leander class frigates (which had entered service in 1960s) and the Type 21 frigate (a general purpose design that recently entered service) as "the backbone of the Royal Navy's surface ship anti-submarine force". Although not intended to replace the Type 22 frigate, reductions in the size of the Navy due to the 1998 Strategic Defence Review led to HMS St Albans replacing HMS Coventry, a Type 22 frigate.

The ships were intended to carry a towed array sonar to detect Soviet submarines in the North Atlantic and carry a Westland Lynx or EHI Merlin helicopter to attack them. It was initially proposed that the frigates would not mount defensive armament. Instead the Sea Wolf missile system was to be carried by Fort Victoria class replenishment oilers, one of which was to support typically four Type 23s. The Fort class oilers would also provide servicing facilities for the force's helicopters; the Type 23 would have facilities only for rearming and refuelling them.

As a result of lessons learned from the Falklands War, the design grew in size and complexity to encompass the Vertical Launch Sea Wolf (VLS) system with an extra tracking system as a defence against low-flying aircraft and sea-skimming anti-ship missiles such as Exocet. With the addition of Harpoon surface-to-surface missiles and a medium calibre gun for naval gunfire support, the Type 23 had evolved into a more complex and balanced vessel optimised for general warfare, which introduced a host of new technologies and concepts to the Royal Navy. These included extensive radar cross section reduction design measures, automation to substantially reduce crew size, a Combined diesel-electric and gas (CODLAG) propulsion system providing very quiet running for anti-submarine operations along with excellent range, vertical launch missile technology and a fully distributed combat management system.

The Vertical Launch Sea Wolf surface-to-air missile system was designed for and first deployed on the Type 23. Unlike conventional Sea Wolf, the missile is boosted vertically until it clears the ship's superstructure and then turns to fly directly to the target. Consequently, the ship's structure does not cause no-fire zones that would delay or inhibit missile firing in a conventionally launched system.

Although the Type 23 is officially the "Duke" class, and includes such famous names as HMS Iron Duke, (which had been the name of the battleship HMS Iron Duke, Admiral Jellicoe's flagship at the Battle of Jutland), five of the names had previously been used on classes known as the "County class": Kent and Norfolk were names given both to 1960s guided missile destroyers and Second World War-era County class heavy cruisers, while Monmouth, Lancaster, Kent and Argyll revived names carried by First World War-era Monmouth class armoured cruisers. This use of Ducal and County names broke a tradition of alphabetical names for escort ships which had run in two – not unbroken – cycles from the L-class destroyers of 1913 to the Daring-class destroyers of 1950; this progression was revived with the Amazon-class Type 21 frigates of 1972–75, and continued with B and C names for most of the Type 22 frigates of 1976–89. However, the D names have since been used for the new Type 45 Daring-class destroyers, the first of which entered service in 2009.

It is stated that: "Type 23 frigates achieved approximately 85–89 per cent average availability for operational service in each of the last five years with the exception of 1996 when the figure dropped to just over 80 per cent due to a number of ships experiencing a particular defect. This discounts time spent in planned maintenance."

Unlike the Type 45 destroyer, the "Type 23 frigate does not have the capability or configuration to act as flagship and is not tasked in this way."


Upgrades and future technologies

Mid-life refit
The class are currently going through mid-life refits which last 12–18 months and cost £15-20m. Aside from refurbishment of the mess decks and drive train, the ships are being fitted with a transom flap which can add up to 1 knot to the top speed and reduce fuel consumption by 13%, and Intersleek anti-fouling paint which added 2 knots to the top speed of Ark Royal. Although the top speed of the Duke class is commonly quoted as 28 knots, the caption of an official Navy photo suggests that Lancaster was capable of 32 knots even before her mid-life refit; The Sea Wolf Mid Life Update (SWMLU) improves the sensors and guidance of the missiles, point defences are further improved with new remotely operated 30mm guns, and Mod 1 of the Mk8 main gun has an all-electric loading system and a smaller radar cross-section. The communications and command systems are also upgraded.

Sonar 2087
Sonar 2087 is described by its manufacturer as "a towed-array system that enables Type 23 frigates to hunt the latest submarines at considerable distances and locate them beyond the range at which they [submarines] can launch an attack." Sonar 2087 was fitted to eight Type 23 frigates in mid-life refits between 2004 and 2012; the five oldest Type 23 frigates, HMS Montrose, Monmouth, Iron Duke, Lancaster and Argyll are not scheduled to receive Sonar 2087. These ships will instead continue to be employed across the normal range of standing Royal Navy deployments. The Chilean Navy is procuring a number of Sonar 2087 towed arrays from Thales Underwater Systems to equip its multipurpose frigates.

Type 997 Artisan 3D radar
The Type 23's medium range radar will be replaced by BAE Systems Insyte Type 997 Artisan 3D radar. It is a medium range radar designed to be extremely modular and highly configurable to provide a cost-effective high-performance radar, capable of operating effectively in littoral zones and improving air-defence, anti-surface (anti-ship) and air traffic management capabilities of the Type 23 frigates. Protection measures are also added to maintain detection ranges even when attacked by complex jammers. HMS Iron Duke is the first Type 23 frigate to have received the Type 997 Artisan 3D radar during her refit in 2012–13. It will be fitted to all T23's as well as the assault platforms (LPD) - HMS Albion & HMS Bulwark, the Helicopter Platform (LPH) - HMS Ocean and the two future Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers are also planned to be equipped with the same radar. The project was worth £100 Million and the contract was announced in 4 August 2008.

HMS Iron Duke received her new Type 997 Artisan 3D radar in 2013. It is claimed the radar is 5 times more capable than the Type 996 radar it replaces.

Common Anti-Air Modular Missile
The CAMM(M) variant of the Common Anti-Air Modular Missile is intended to replace the current Sea Wolf missile currently equipped on the Type 23 frigates starting from 2016. CAMM(M) has a longer range of 1–25+ km compared to the 1–10 km offered by the Sea Wolf missile. An option exists to give the missile a surface-attack capability, though it is currently understood the Royal Navy will not take that option, due to budget reasons. Like Sea Wolf, CAMM(M) will be VLS launched, however due to its design, CAMM(M) can be packed much more tightly into the VLS, with up to four CAMM(M) fitting into the space occupied by one Sea Wolf missile. CAMM(M) is known as Sea Ceptor in Royal Navy service.


Ships of the class
On 21 July 2004, in the Delivering Security in a Changing World review of defence spending, Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon announced that HMS Norfolk, Marlborough and Grafton were to be paid off. In 2005 it was announced that these three vessels would be sold to the Chilean Navy and to be delivered in 2008. In September 2005 BAE Systems was awarded a £134 million GBP contract to prepare the frigates for transfer. The Marlborough, Norfolk and Grafton were sold to Chile for a total of £134 million. The letter of intent for purchase was signed in December 2004, followed by a formal contract on 7 September 2005. The Norfolk was handed over by the Defence Logistics Organisation and BAE Systems and commissioned into the Chilean Navy on 22 November 2006, and named Almirante Cochrane (FF-05) (after Lord Cochrane, a naval hero to both the British and Chileans). The Grafton was delivered to Chilean Navy on 28 March 2007 at Portsmouth and renamed Almirante Lynch (FF-07). The Marlborough was delivered to Chilean Navy on 28 May 2008 at Portsmouth and renamed Almirante Condell (FF-06).


1. HMS Norfolk (F230) Commissioned 1990 (Later sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2006 as 'Almirante Cochrane' (FF05))
2. HMS Marlborough (F233) Commissioned 1991 (Later sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2008 as 'Almirante Condell' (FF06))
3. HMS Argyll (F231) Commissioned 1991
4. HMS Lancaster (F229) Commissioned 1992 (originally with pennant number F232)
5. HMS Iron Duke (F234) Commissioned 1993
6. HMS Monmouth (F235) Commissioned 1993
7. HMS Montrose (F236) Commissioned 1994
8. HMS Westminster (F237) Commissioned 1994
9. HMS Northumberland (F238) Commissioned 1994
10. HMS Richmond (F239) Commissioned 1995
11. HMS Somerset (F82) Commissioned 1996
12. HMS Grafton (F80) Commissioned 1997 (Later Sold to Chile, Recommissioned 2007 as 'Almirante Lynch' (FF07))
13. HMS Sutherland (F81) Commissioned 1997
14. HMS Kent (F78) Commissioned 2000
15. HMS Portland (F79) Commissioned 2001
16. HMS St Albans (F83) Commissioned 2002


Displacement: 4,900 t (4,800 long tons; 5,400 short tons)
Length: 133 m (436 ft 4 in)
Beam: 16.1 m (52 ft 10 in)
Draught: 7.3 m (23 ft 9 in)
Propulsion: CODLAG:
Four 1510 kW (2,025 shp) Paxman Valenta 12CM diesel generators
Two GEC electric motors delivering 2980kW (4000 shp)
Two Rolls-Royce Spey SM1C delivering 23,190 kW (31,100 shp)
Speed: In excess of 28 kn (52 km/h; 32 mph) (HMS Sutherland achieved 34.4 knots during high-speed trials in November of 2008)
Range: 7,500 nautical miles (14,000 km) at 15 kn (28 km/h)
Crew Complement: 185 (accommodation for up to 205)
Electronic warfare
and decoys:

UAF-1 ESM, or, UAT Mod 1
Seagnat
Type 182 towed torpedo decoy
Surface Ship Torpedo Defence
Armament:
Anti-air missiles:
1 × 32-cell Sea Wolf GWS.26 VLS canisters for 32:
Sea Wolf missiles (range 1-10 km)
Anti-ship missiles:
2 × quad Harpoon launchers
Anti-submarine torpedoes:
2 × Twin 12.75 in (324 mm) Sting Ray torpedo tubes
Guns:
1 × BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun
2 × 30mm DS30M Mk2 guns, or, 2× 30mm DS30B guns
2 × Miniguns
4 × General purpose machine guns
Aircraft carried: 1 × Lynx HMA8, armed with;
4 × Sea Skua anti ship missiles, or
2 × anti submarine torpedoes
or
1 × Westland Merlin HM1, armed with;
4 × anti submarine torpedoes
Aviation facilities:
Flight deck
Enclosed hangar

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class)

Postby SKB » 02 May 2015, 16:30

Sailors standing on the flight decks of Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster (and Type 45 destroyer HMS Dragon) today, spelt out the word "sister" in honour of the new royal baby girl born to HRH Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.
Image

HMS Lancaster is known as 'The Queen's Ship', as Her Majesty is also 'The Duke Of Lancaster'.
HMS Dragon is strongly associated with Wales.

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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby SKB » 06 May 2015, 23:09

Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate (HMS Montrose) Introduction Video

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby malcrf » 07 May 2015, 06:52

Be nice not to decommission them when the T26's come along, but use them as some sort of semi-active reserve operating in home and near waters whilst our front-line ships are wandering the globe.

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby bobp » 07 May 2015, 08:12

I read that when they start building the T26 Frigates they are going to take some of the armament off the T23 ships and additionally the Sonar and Radar equipment will also be transferred. The radar is currently being upgraded to Artisan, which is also fitted to other ships in the fleet.
I guess the idea of this is to save money to reduce the purchase price of the ships. Politicians have a lot to answer for in that respect.

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Tony Williams » 07 May 2015, 09:12

bobp wrote:I read that when they start building the T26 Frigates they are going to take some of the armament off the T23 ships


Yes - most notably the Sea Ceptor missile system, which is to be first installed on the T23 fleet to replace Sea Wolf before being transferred over to the T26 ships as they are built.

I guess the idea of this is to save money to reduce the purchase price of the ships. Politicians have a lot to answer for in that respect.


Actually I think it's a good idea. It means that the systems get thoroughly debugged on the existing ships before being fitted to the new ones. IMO this is a much better approach than the usual one of ordering new ships with entirely new, untried systems (like T45, for instance), which is guaranteed to maximise the risk of delays and cost increases.

In my ideal world, new ships would always be introduced with tried-and-tested systems, with new systems installed during major updates so that they are tried and tested in turn before being installed in the next generation of new ships. This would also spread the workload for the shipyards, giving them a constant flow of business.

The same applies to combat aircraft. Trying to pack in every technological advance that anyone can think of into a new design gets you into terribly long-drawn-out, ludicrously expensive messes like the F-35....

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby WhitestElephant » 07 May 2015, 12:44

malcrf wrote:Be nice not to decommission them when the T26's come along, but use them as some sort of semi-active reserve operating in home and near waters whilst our front-line ships are wandering the globe.


The T23s will be shagged by the time T26 replaces them. Would be costly to keep them sea worthy etc If you want something to operate in British waters, keep the Batch 1 River-class OPVs in addition to the Batch 2s - this will free up the high-end escort slots.
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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Tiny Toy » 08 May 2015, 11:38

Sea Ceptor (crap name) is not yet in service on Type 23s AFAIK, it's supposed to replace Sea Wolf next year. Looks like a very good thing from all reports.

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Old RN » 09 May 2015, 17:15

I did not realise the Type 23s were so fast, 34.4kts! How much difference did the new anti-fouling paint make?

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby WhitestElephant » 09 May 2015, 20:58

Old RN wrote:I did not realise the Type 23s were so fast, 34.4kts! How much difference did the new anti-fouling paint make?


I think that goes for all British (and Western) kit to be honest. Advertised capabilities are carefully chosen using certain parameters and then underestimated some. Whereas in the East <cough> Russia, capabilities tend to be overestimates using the most favourable of parameters.
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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby desertswo » 10 May 2015, 08:51

WhitestElephant wrote:
Old RN wrote:I did not realise the Type 23s were so fast, 34.4kts! How much difference did the new anti-fouling paint make?


I think that goes for all British (and Western) kit to be honest. Advertised capabilities are carefully chosen using certain parameters and then underestimated some. Whereas in the East <cough> Russia, capabilities tend to be overestimates using the most favourable of parameters.


Yeah, one frigate in which I was chief engineer was only supposed to be capable of 27 knots. We regularly did 31.
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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby The Armchair Soldier » 13 May 2015, 12:31

HMS Sutherland launching a Stingray torpedo:


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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby sea_eagle » 26 May 2015, 20:54

The upgraded Sea Wolf system will begin to be replaced, starting next year, with the cold launched CAMM missile. Initially the 32x Sea Wolf will be replaced in a straight 1 for 1 swop. Combined with the replacement of the old 996 radar with the new 3D 997 Artisan radar will give the T23 a significant upgrade. Of course no reason not to think that the CAMM numbers could be increased over time by quad packing some of the silos.

Removing the Sea Wolf means the 2x 5ton 911 fire control radars can go (so the T23 will go even faster!) Surely the biggest deficiency now is the absence of any CIWS. Do people think there will be room to fit 2x Phalanx systems to the upgraded ships as I have not heard of any plan/hope to do this. Surely it is essential for Gulf patrols and the like?

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby GibMariner » 26 May 2015, 23:13

sea_eagle wrote:The upgraded Sea Wolf system will begin to be replaced, starting next year, with the cold launched CAMM missile. Initially the 32x Sea Wolf will be replaced in a straight 1 for 1 swop. Combined with the replacement of the old 996 radar with the new 3D 997 Artisan radar will give the T23 a significant upgrade. Of course no reason not to think that the CAMM numbers could be increased over time by quad packing some of the silos.

Removing the Sea Wolf means the 2x 5ton 911 fire control radars can go (so the T23 will go even faster!) Surely the biggest deficiency now is the absence of any CIWS. Do people think there will be room to fit 2x Phalanx systems to the upgraded ships as I have not heard of any plan/hope to do this. Surely it is essential for Gulf patrols and the like?


Is there any info about which ship(s) will be the first to have its Sea Wolf system replaced with the CAMM/Sea Ceptor (horrible name) system?

Likewise, which T23s have received the new 997 Artisan radars to date? Has there been any announcement if all T23 will receive the new radars or if only 8 have been ordered to later be transplanted onto the T26?

I think Iron Duke was the first to receive it a couple of years ago, and has already test fired Sea Wolf with it. I believe Sutherland is the most recent one to come out of refit with the new radar. Monmouth's refit should also be almost complete. Which could mean 3 997 radars in service this year. Montrose went into refit a few months ago and I think was expected back in service in 2016. Have I missed any?

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Gabriele » 27 May 2015, 00:14

GibMariner wrote:
sea_eagle wrote:The upgraded Sea Wolf system will begin to be replaced, starting next year, with the cold launched CAMM missile. Initially the 32x Sea Wolf will be replaced in a straight 1 for 1 swop. Combined with the replacement of the old 996 radar with the new 3D 997 Artisan radar will give the T23 a significant upgrade. Of course no reason not to think that the CAMM numbers could be increased over time by quad packing some of the silos.

Removing the Sea Wolf means the 2x 5ton 911 fire control radars can go (so the T23 will go even faster!) Surely the biggest deficiency now is the absence of any CIWS. Do people think there will be room to fit 2x Phalanx systems to the upgraded ships as I have not heard of any plan/hope to do this. Surely it is essential for Gulf patrols and the like?


Is there any info about which ship(s) will be the first to have its Sea Wolf system replaced with the CAMM/Sea Ceptor (horrible name) system?

Likewise, which T23s have received the new 997 Artisan radars to date? Has there been any announcement if all T23 will receive the new radars or if only 8 have been ordered to later be transplanted onto the T26?

I think Iron Duke was the first to receive it a couple of years ago, and has already test fired Sea Wolf with it. I believe Sutherland is the most recent one to come out of refit with the new radar. Monmouth's refit should also be almost complete. Which could mean 3 997 radars in service this year. Montrose went into refit a few months ago and I think was expected back in service in 2016. Have I missed any?



Don't know which Type 23 will be the first to get CAMM / Sea Ceptor at this point. Regarding 997, i've tried to keep track. My list goes:

HMS Iron Duke - fitted
HMS Argyll - fitted
HMS Sutherland – returned to sea March 2015 for post-refit trials
HMS Monmouth - expected at sea later this year, back in operations next year
HMS Montrose – refit began October 2014 in Devonport
HMS Westminster – refit began November 2014 in Dock 15, Portsmouth
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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Tony Williams » 27 May 2015, 04:21

sea_eagle wrote:Of course no reason not to think that the CAMM numbers could be increased over time by quad packing some of the silos.


I assumed that quad-packing was only an option for the Sylver and larger silos. Is there any evidence that CAMM could be quad-packed in Sea Wolf silos?

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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby ArmChairCivvy » 27 May 2015, 08:37

My impression, too.

It has been questioned why should there be quadpacked SeaCeptors in silos that can take a more capable missile? The likelihood to run out of shots against a swarm attack is less, the missile is actively guided so there can be more of them in flight at the same time (,not to forget the cost per unit).

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Gabriele » 27 May 2015, 08:45

Tony Williams wrote:
sea_eagle wrote:Of course no reason not to think that the CAMM numbers could be increased over time by quad packing some of the silos.


I assumed that quad-packing was only an option for the Sylver and larger silos. Is there any evidence that CAMM could be quad-packed in Sea Wolf silos?


The silo will be changed quite dramatically, if the MBDA information is anything to go by. Half of the current silo will be closed over and used to host electronics and support equipment (four launch management systems), with the missile cells (12) all on one side. Each of the 12 cells can hold 4 CAMM canisters, for a total of 48, the same missile load expected for the Type 26. Technically, 48 CAMM fit where just some 16 Sea Wolf used to fit, more or less.
Note that the "cells" in this case, due to CAMM being cold launched, are literally just holes with a protective lid. The missiles are contained and launched from their sealed canister, which is the same for the Navy and Army variant.
The Sea Wolf circular tubes will be removed.

MBDA video. Type 23 installation from around 1:30
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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby GibMariner » 27 May 2015, 09:03

Don't know which Type 23 will be the first to get CAMM / Sea Ceptor at this point. Regarding 997, i've tried to keep track. My list goes:

HMS Iron Duke - fitted
HMS Argyll - fitted
HMS Sutherland – returned to sea March 2015 for post-refit trials
HMS Monmouth - expected at sea later this year, back in operations next year
HMS Montrose – refit began October 2014 in Devonport
HMS Westminster – refit began November 2014 in Dock 15, Portsmouth



Thanks for the info Gabriele!

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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby GibMariner » 27 May 2015, 09:07

Does anyone know if the frigates that didn't get the Type 2087 towed array sonar kept/still use their older 2031 sonars?

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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Gabriele » 27 May 2015, 09:19

GibMariner wrote:Does anyone know if the frigates that didn't get the Type 2087 towed array sonar kept/still use their older 2031 sonars?


Pretty sure the non-2087 no longer have a towed sonar array. The 2031 was disembarked and removed from service, i believe.
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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby GibMariner » 27 May 2015, 09:29

Gabriele wrote:
GibMariner wrote:Does anyone know if the frigates that didn't get the Type 2087 towed array sonar kept/still use their older 2031 sonars?


Pretty sure the non-2087 no longer have a towed sonar array. The 2031 was disembarked and removed from service, i believe.


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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Foxbat » 27 May 2015, 20:16

Gabriele wrote:MBDA video. Type 23 installation from around 1:30


The perfectionist in my kind of wishes that the new cells were central in the silo rather than off to one side. But I guess it's the easiest way of fitting them and all the electronic gubbins into the available space. Still, I think it makes them look a bit lopsided!

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Re: Type 23 Frigates (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby ggw22 » 27 May 2015, 20:37

GibMariner wrote:
Don't know which Type 23 will be the first to get CAMM / Sea Ceptor at this point. Regarding 997, i've tried to keep track. My list goes:

HMS Iron Duke - fitted
HMS Argyll - fitted
HMS Sutherland – returned to sea March 2015 for post-refit trials
HMS Monmouth - expected at sea later this year, back in operations next year
HMS Montrose – refit began October 2014 in Devonport
HMS Westminster – refit began November 2014 in Dock 15, Portsmouth



Thanks for the info Gabriele!


Gents,

Somerset also has it fitted. See here:

Expect others to get it fitted during FTSPs, as SOM did. Not necessarily a docking job.

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Re: Type 23 Frigate (Duke Class) (RN)

Postby Gabriele » 27 May 2015, 21:47

Nice, i had seen those photos this morning but did not notice.
You might also know me as Liger30, from that great forum than MP.net was.

Arma Pacis Fulcra.
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